Supreme Court leaves in place ruling reviving Flint lawsuits

Corporate Law

The Supreme Court is leaving in place a ruling that revived two federal lawsuits stemming from the lead-tainted water crisis in Flint, Michigan.

The Supreme Court declined Monday to get involved in the cases, leaving in place a decision by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The appeals court ruled in July 2017 that a federal trial court had improperly dismissed federal civil rights claims in the lawsuits, which were brought by Flint residents. The trial court ruled that a federal law called the Safe Drinking Water Act precluded those claims, but the appeals court disagreed.

The Supreme Court's decision not to get involved means the cases will return to the trial court to move forward. Other similar lawsuits are also at the trial court level.

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Grounds for Divorce in Ohio - Sylkatis Law, LLC

A divorce in Ohio is filed when there is typically “fault” by one of the parties and party not at “fault” seeks to end the marriage. A court in Ohio may grant a divorce for the following reasons:
• Willful absence of the adverse party for one year
• Adultery
• Extreme cruelty
• Fraudulent contract
• Any gross neglect of duty
• Habitual drunkenness
• Imprisonment in a correctional institution at the time of filing the complaint
• Procurement of a divorce outside this state by the other party

Additionally, there are two “no-fault” basis for which a court may grant a divorce:
• When the parties have, without interruption for one year, lived separate and apart without cohabitation
• Incompatibility, unless denied by either party

However, whether or not the the court grants the divorce for “fault” or not, in Ohio the party not at “fault” will not get a bigger slice of the marital property.